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Aug 10

Interview Questions to Ask the Employer

interview questionsWhen you go to a job interview, you expect them to ask you questions, but more often than not, they will turn the tables on you and finish the interview by asking if you have any questions you’d like to ask them. What they’re looking for here is to see whether or not you care enough about the job to get clarification on the position and company you’re joining. Impress your interviewer by asking a couple of our sample concluding job interview questions. Remember, the interviewer wants to know that you’re not just looking for any job; they want to sense that you are looking for the job they are offering and with that company. That way, they’ll know that you’ll be good a fit for the job.


Interview Questions to Ask the Employer

  • Can you tell me what my exact responsibilities would be or what a typical day would look like?
  • Are you creating a new position or would I be taking over for someone else?
  • Who would my direct supervisor be? What can you tell me about them?
  • Would I be working alone most of the time or can I expect to be a part of a team of people?
  • Will I be expected to do much travelling for this position?
  • Will I have to move in order to take this position?
  • Is this job full-time? If not, how many hours per week do you expect you could schedule me?
  • What are the advancement opportunities? How does this company handle promotions?
  • How long have you worked for this company and why do you like it here?
  • Do you know when you’ll be making a hiring decision? How soon would I be expected to start if I am hired?

    These are all great interview questions to ask your prospective employer, but keep in mind that not all of them will apply to every position you’re seeking. And don’t ask too many questions of your interviewer, either. You don’t want to seem like you’re interrogating them – Remember, they want you to be interested in the position, but you are still the one being interviewed. You should pick a couple of the most relevant questions to ask for each interview and in an appropriate and respectful manner, ask the employer these specific questions to give them the idea that you are genuinely interested in this position and their company.

    Lastly, be sure to never ask questions that may leave a negative impression of you. If you ask about what exactly the company does as a whole, your interviewer will know that you haven’t done your homework in researching the job and are just looking for a paycheck – Don’t expect a call back. If you ask about getting time off or vacations, they’ll assume you don’t really want to work that hard and are most interested in the company benefits. If you ask whether or not you got the job, they’ll assume you’re impatient. Wait for the interviewer to tell you these types of things when they actually offer you the job. If they don’t offer you the job, you don’t need to know them anyway.

  • 4 comments

    1. reza@job opportunities

      I found very useful information from your post on Interview Questions to Ask the Employer. I appreciate your nice presentation that helps to understand the topics easily. Thanks for your informative post.

    2. Jeremy @ Gift Ideas For Valentine's Day

      This is a post I wish I would have read a year ago. I got that question at end of an interview and said “No”. Got the job but I should have interviewed them a bit more. Worst Job EVER.

    3. Jim@KitchenBlossom

      For sure the worst thing to do at the end of the interview when they ask you if you have any questions for them is to say, “Uhm, nope.” Worst. You can actually stand out in a HUGE way if you say, “Yes.” and proceed to ask really intelligent questions. They interviewer will be like, “Man. This person has their stuff together.”

    4. Petra

      I am afraid that except of the 2nd one it doesn’t work because
      •Can you tell me what my exact responsibilities would be or what a typical day would look like?
      Usually, I recieve the question from the COMPANY to try to describe what will be my responsibilites.
      •Are you creating a new position or would I be taking over for someone else?
      OK for this one.
      •Who would my direct supervisor be? What can you tell me about them?
      100% attends the interview, at least in my region.
      •Would I be working alone most of the time or can I expect to be a part of a team of people?
      As soon as I apply to any position, from the job description it is obvious what “level” of team work can be expected.
      •Will I be expected to do much travelling for this position?
      This is already defined in the job description and for me, very important.
      •Will I have to move in order to take this position?
      Not applicable in our region. It is clear in the very beginning if something like this occurs.
      •Is this job full-time? If not, how many hours per week do you expect you could schedule me?
      Again, part of the job description as such…
      •What are the advancement opportunities? How does this company handle promotions?
      Are you sure that you will ask for the promotion when being interviewed?
      •How long have you worked for this company and why do you like it here?
      It is kind of personal question and not good to ask. This is kind of chatty question for the 1st coffee break in your new job.
      •Do you know when you’ll be making a hiring decision? How soon would I be expected to start if I am hired?
      This is usually being told automatically, and can’t be treated as the valable question.

      What counts
      - ask for the specific tools used at work (software, mechanical tools, equipment…) – you show your are professional
      - ask for the details of the department – the size, number of team members, if there are similar departments, when it has been created, …
      - ask for the level of using the foreign language (when applicable)

      Good luck to everybody!

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